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Christmas is a festive and joyful time for some, but unfortunately it can be a difficult and challenging time for others. Loved ones and carers may have unpleasant memories of previous Christmas seasons or they may feel surrounded by triggers such as alcohol and noise.

Not everyone has a family or close friends to spend Christmas with and loneliness may be felt more strongly than usual. Carers have to deal not just with their own expectations and hopes for Christmas but also with their loved ones.

If you are one of those carers, we understand that this can be stressful, so it’s important to be kind to yourself and look after yourself.

Please remember that there are services out there still operating during the Christmas period and if it all gets too much, please call the Arafmi support line and we will welcome and support you. You are not alone.

Here is a link to some available services in Brisbane over the Christmas period.

24 Hour Helpline

If you have any questions about this article or need someone to talk to, you can call Arafmi any time of the day on 07 3254 1881. It’s comforting to know that when you need to talk – someone who understands will be there – at any hour.

 

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